NAG-CC-Mitigation (4b)

You get to spend some of your initial 100 to move the slot at the top through which you drop the ball. How much it costs depends on the cost function. A suggestion for the cost function is in the table below but it too needs to be very easy to change.
[In terms of climate change 7 is business as usual, 8-13 are increased emissions above business as usual so they aren’t options, below 7 involves mitigation and costs money.]

Again you have to play N times – you can’t stop half way through – but they are N repeats i.e. each time starting with 100 as in 3.
Again you are presented with the maximum, minimum and average of your N goes. But you are scored on the average.

This should be setup in two ways. A multi-player option can look just like it did in game 2 i.e. up to 4 players, players take turns consecutively, the one with the highest average wins. Alternatively the aim should be to beat a number presented as the target.

Ideally something silly and visual should happen to mark a win or lose.

Galton-CC-Mitigation (4a)

You get to spend some of your initial 100 to move the slot at the top through which you drop the ball. How much it costs depends on the cost function. A suggestion for the cost function is in the table below but it too needs to be very easy to change.
[In terms of climate change 7 is business as usual, 8-13 are increased emissions above business as usual so they aren’t options, below 7 involves mitigation and costs money.]

Again you have to play N times – you can’t stop half way through – but they are N repeats i.e. each time starting with 100 as in 3.
Again you are presented with the maximum, minimum and average of your N goes. But you are scored on the average.

This should be setup in two ways. A multi-player option can look just like it did in game 2 i.e. up to 4 players, players take turns consecutively, the one with the highest average wins. Alternatively the aim should be to beat a number presented as the target.

Ideally something silly and visual should happen to mark a win or lose.

NAG-climate-change (3b)

The point: In climate change you don’t get to play it many times. That’s why each go starts with the same amount. Given current scientific understanding you might get lucky or you might not. This interactive is meant to illustrate that point.

Galton-climate-change (3a)

This isn’t a game it’s another interactive.

You start with 100 credits. You don’t chose to bet anything you just drop the ball in the central slot and see where it comes out. You then lose a certain amount according to where it ends up.

These “lose” numbers are the damage function.

Like in 2a you have N drops but unlike in 2 each time you drop the ball you are re-starting with 100 credits rather than from whatever you had at the end of the last turn. After N drops you are presented with your results which consist of your maximum, minimum and average remaining credits across the N goes.

NAG-heads-tails (2b)

Within any one game the distribution remains the same. But for each time the game is launched we might want it to select a distribution randomly from a set of 5 or 10 or 20 distributions.

Aim is to get the idea of probability. If the NAG distribution is skewed towards low numbers you are more likely to do well. If it is skewed towards high numbers you are less likely to do well. But if your only aim is to beat a competitor then that doesn’t matter.

Galton-heads-tails (2a)

Aim: put across the idea of using probabilities to decide how much to risk/invest.

You drop a ball from the central slot. You win if you are below the middle (i.e. 6 or below); you lose if you are above the middle (i.e. 8 or above); you get another go if it lands in the middle (i.e. 7).

You start with a 100 credits. You invest some credits before you drop the ball; say x credits. You can’t invest less than 1.
If you win you get your money back and the same again i.e. 2x back.

You have 10 goes.

Your total score is how much you have at the end.

NAG-random-win (1b)

Simple random win or lose game. You click to drop the ball in the central top slot. It makes its way to the bottom. Then the computer drops a different coloured ball and it makes it way to the bottom. The bins at the bottom are labelled from 1 to 13. You win if you end up in a higher bin than the computer.

Galton-random-win (1a)

Simple random win or lose game. You click to drop the ball in the central top slot. It makes its way to the bottom. Then the computer drops a different coloured ball and it makes it way to the bottom. The bins at the bottom are labelled from 1 to 13. You win if you end up in a higher bin than the computer.

NAG (0b)

Each pin here has a 50:50 chance that the ball will go to either side. Which one it “chooses” is random but with a 50% probability for each of the two possibilities. In its default setting the ball is dropped from between the central two pins.

Simply drop a ball in the central top slot and watch it fall with an option to drop many balls and watch the distribution build up in the background.

Galton (0a)

Each pin here has a 50:50 chance that the ball will go to either side. Which one it “chooses” is random but with a 50% probability for each of the two possibilities. In its default setting the ball is dropped from between the central two pins.

Simply drop a ball in the central top slot and watch it fall with an option to drop many balls and watch the distribution build up in the background.